Results from the 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings

This report presents results pertaining to mental health from the 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older. This report presents national estimates of the prevalence of past year mental disorders and past year mental health service utilization for youths aged 12 to 17 and adults aged 18 or older. Among adults, estimates presented include rates and numbers of persons with any mental illness (AMI), serious mental illness (SMI), suicidal thoughts and behavior, major depressive episode (MDE), treatment for depression (among adults with MDE), and mental health service utilization. Estimates presented in this report for youths include MDE, treatment for depression (among youths with MDE), and mental health service utilization. Measures related to the co-occurrence of mental disorders with substance use or with substance use disorders also are presented for both adults and youths. The report focuses mainly on trends between 2010 and 2011 and differences across population subgroups in 2011.

Some highlights from the report:

  • The percentage of adults with AMI in the past year was highest for adults aged 18 to 25 (29.8 percent), followed by those aged 26 to 49 (21.4 percent), then by those aged 50 or older (14.3 percent).
  • Adult women in 2011 were more likely than adult men to have AMI in the past year (23.0 vs. 15.9 percent).
  • In 2011, the percentage of persons aged 18 or older with past year AMI was 15.9 percent among Hispanics, 16.1 percent among Asians, 18.8 percent among blacks, 20.5 percent among whites, 28.3 percent among persons reporting two or more races, and 28.9 percent among American Indians or Alaska Natives. The estimate of past year AMI among Native Hawaiians or Other Pacific Islanders aged 18 or older could not be reported because of low precision.
  • In 2011, the percentage of adults with past year AMI was higher among unemployed persons (28.0 percent) than among either full-time (16.1 percent) or part-time (23.2 percent) employed persons. Adults employed part time also were more likely than those employed full time to have past year AMI.
  • The percentage of adults with AMI was highest among those with a past year family income that was less than 100 percent of the Federal poverty level (29.6 percent), followed by those with a family income at 100 to 199 percent of the Federal poverty level (23.1 percent), then by adults with a family income at 200 percent or more of the Federal poverty level (16.2 percent).
  • In 2011, the percentage of adults with Medicaid or Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) who had AMI in the past year (32.4 percent) was higher than the percentages among adults with private health insurance (16.3 percent), those with no health insurance (24.3 percent), and those with other forms of health insurance (17.3 percent). Having other forms of health insurance is defined as having Medicare, CHAMPUS, TRICARE, CHAMPVA, the VA, military health care, or any other type of health insurance.
  • The percentage of adults in 2011 with past year AMI was 39.0 percent among those on probation in the past year, which was higher than that among adults who were not on probation in the past year (19.2 percent). Similarly, among adults on parole or supervised release in the past year, the percentage having AMI was 29.5 percent, which was higher than the percentage having AMI among adults who were not on parole or supervised release in the past year (19.5 percent).

Population of focus: Civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older

Link to resource: Results from the 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings

Date: 2011

Organization: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration